Financial Steps in the Right Direction

January 12, 2022

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Denise and Chris Arand

Denise and Chris Arand

Executive Vice Presidents/Financial Strategists

2173 Salk Ave
#250
Carlsbad, CA 92008

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January 12, 2022

Financial Steps in the Right Direction

Financial Steps in the Right Direction

It’s not just about money. It’s about what you do with it… and how you feel about it.

It doesn’t matter if your balance is $0 or $1 million dollars, because that dollar figure is meaningless without context and perspective. What matters most is how you feel about your finances and the choices you make with them every day, week, month—all year long.

But there are some very practical things we can all do to keep our financial ship on course even in challenging times:

1. Pay off high-interest debt

2. Save 10% of your income

3. Buy life insurance now

4. Start a side gig

Pay off high-interest debt before saving for retirement. This is a very important step that should not be overlooked or minimized. Paying off credit card debt with high interest rates can save you huge amounts of money and make other savings goals easier to reach.

Save 10% of your income. It’s always wise to consistently save as much as you can. Yet, the rule of thumb that says we should save 10% of our income is still a solid one. Remember – saving is just for you – it’s not an investment per se, but rather a protection from any nasty surprises down the road and a way to ensure you have more money to save, invest and live on.

Buy life insurance now. Life insurance is often misunderstood and misused. As such, many people fail to see its value in terms of providing for their loved ones or even protecting their own future. However, life insurance provides a way to protect your family and business in the event of an unforeseen tragedy.

Start a side gig. It will not only provide you with a second stream of income, but will offer an additional sense of security and freedom.

For many people, their financial lives become clouded with stress and anxiety because they don’t have a way to earn extra money. The solution is often as simple as taking some of the time they’d normally spend watching TV and learning a new skill, or getting a part-time job on weekends.

However you choose to start making more money, focus on what is going to make you happier in life. Because if you’re financially free, secure and happy – that’s true wealth.

The most important thing to remember is that it’s not about how much money you make or have, but what you do with your money—how you feel about it. Make smart financial choices and things will happen for the better.

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December 13, 2021

Digital Nomadism: What You Need to Know

Digital Nomadism: What You Need to Know

Ever wish you could travel the world AND earn a living at the same darn time?

Of course! Building a digital income source under the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, in a cozy cabin in the Alps, or among majestic Sequoia trees sounds like a dream.

But it’s becoming a reality for many. Think about the travel influencers you follow, or your college friends sitting on a beach with their laptops enjoying a beer. They’re all digital nomads.

You’re not imagining things—digital nomadism has exploded since the COVID-19 pandemic first began, growing 49% from 2019 to 2020.¹

If you’re considering ditching the cubicle for the open road, here are a few key facts and figures you should know!

83% of digital nomads are self-employed.² The majority of self-employed nomads are entrepreneurs (66%), while the remainder are freelancers (34%). It’s not impossible to work and travel while keeping your day job. But there’s a clear connection between the independence of the road and owning your own business.

49% of digital nomads earn the same income or more as their office job.³ In addition, digital nomads often enjoy a lower cost of living. With the wonders of Wifi, they can host meetings with clients in the US and Europe while enjoying lower cost locations like South America or South East Asia.

80% of digital nomads prefer to stay in one place for 3 to 9 months.⁴ It’s no wonder—setting up shop in one location can help nomads establish routines and boost their productivity. Plus, it’s the best way to truly soak in a new culture and experience.

The #1 reason digital nomads return home is loneliness.⁵ Distance from family and old friends can become hard to cope with. And finding community among an ever-shifting sea of locations and new acquaintances can be even harder. It’s the reason why nomads have established co-working spaces around the world. They serve as hubs for nomads to socialize and build friendships.

Time will tell if digital nomadism is a pandemic fad or a seismic shift in how we work. But if you’ve longed for a work/travel lifestyle, there’s never been a better time to make it happen.

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¹ “15 Digital Nomad Statistics and Exciting Trends 2021 Update,” Project Untethered, 2021, https://www.projectuntethered.com/digital-nomad-statistics/

² “63 Surprising Digital Nomad Statistics in 2021,” A Brother Abroad, Nov 23, 2021, https://abrotherabroad.com/digital-nomad-statistics/

³ “15 Digital Nomad Statistics and Exciting Trends 2021 Update,” Project Untethered, 2021, https://www.projectuntethered.com/digital-nomad-statistics/

⁴ “63 Surprising Digital Nomad Statistics in 2021,” A Brother Abroad, Nov 23, 2021, https://abrotherabroad.com/digital-nomad-statistics/

⁵ “63 Surprising Digital Nomad Statistics in 2021,” A Brother Abroad, Nov 23, 2021, https://abrotherabroad.com/digital-nomad-statistics/

December 8, 2021

Transform Your Mess Into Money

Transform Your Mess Into Money

Have you ever opened up your garage and thought “YIKES!!!”?

As the door creaks open, it slowly reveals a maze of tools, trinkets, pictures, memorabilia, and, if we’re honest, straight up junk.

It’s a disaster. A catastrophe. Stressful. And it could make you a whole lot of money.

Here’s how…

Step 1: Take inventory of your stuff. From ball bearings to Beanie Babies to unused tools to picture frames, create a list of everything that’s cluttering your home.

Be ruthless. If you haven’t used something for years or it’s stressing you out, put it on the list. Be as specific as possible about features, condition, and age.

Then, search for similar items on Craigslist and eBay. Tally the prices next to the items on your inventory. Add the numbers together. That total is how much you stand to make (minus expenses) if you play your cards right. You might be surprised by how high the number actually is!

Step 2: Sell it all. You have a few avenues available for monetizing everything…

Garage sale. This is the simplest way to sell your stuff FAST. Put up a sign, organize everything as best as possible, and get ready for a hectic morning!

While a garage sale can liquidate your clutter in record time, you’ll almost certainly sell your goods for much less than what they may be worth. Garage sales attract every spendthrift and penny pincher for miles around. They’ll expect bargains, and it’s best to give them what they want!

Online marketplaces. This is your best option for truly competitive prices. That’s because it broadens your potential customer base across the country. And in that expanded customer base are some… how to say this…. devoted collectors.

Those books from the thrift store you bought for $3 on a whim? They’re part of an obscure sci-fi trilogy with a fanatical—and well-paying—fanbase.

That bedside table your great uncle left you? It’s exactly what a local mom with an eye for antiques needs to complete the guest bedroom.

And yes, the ridiculous toy collection from your grandparents that you never opened is now worth a fortune.

Just be warned that every online marketplace is different. Some will charge for creating a listing, others will want a slice of the profits. Social media platforms and groups are excellent places to reach local customers. Decide which platform works best for you, see how items are priced, and start selling!

Step 3: Reap the rewards wisely. Remember, getting rid of your stuff isn’t going to be free. By this time, you’ve committed a chunk of your energy and time to monetizing your mess. The money you earn isn’t a random windfall—it’s the result of your hard work.

Whatever you earn, commit it towards your existing financial goals, like…

- Eliminating debt

- Saving for retirement

- Buying a new home

And just like that, you’ve turned your mess into money and your stress into confidence. It’s a feeling that’s worth more than anything sitting in your garage.

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March 22, 2021

How to Manage High Costs of Living

How to Manage High Costs of Living

It’s no secret that living in a larger city can be more expensive than in other areas.

Depending on where you live, the cost of buying groceries, public transportation, and even rent can vary drastically! If you want to learn how to manage your finances when living in an area with a higher cost of living, read on…

Lower your housing costs. Keeping a roof over your head is probably your number one expense, especially if you live in a major city. The most straightforward way to free up cash flow, then, is to downsize your apartment or home size.

While that sounds simple, it’s not always easy, particularly if you own a house! But if your budget is too tight and it’s at all possible, moving to a cheaper home or apartment can be the single most effective way to cut your spending and increase your cash flow.

Consider moving to a cheaper area. To find less costly housing, you may choose to relocate to a new neighborhood. But be sure to keep tabs on the price of daily expenses like groceries or increased transportation costs in your new stomping grounds—just because housing is cheaper doesn’t mean everything else will be!

Take on a second job, like freelancing, dog walking, or babysitting. Fortunately, living in a high cost of living area might mean you have access to plenty of part-time or side work. Check out sites like Upwork, and leverage your social networks to find viable gigs.

If you live in an area that’s high cost and has poor employment opportunities, you may need to consider relocating entirely.

Trim your budget. Try using a free budgeting app like Mint or PocketGuard for this one! They’re easy-to-use tools that can help you identify problematic spending patterns. Once you know where you’re wasting money, you can develop a strategy for cutting costs.

Coping with a high cost of living can be challenging, especially if you love the lifestyle of a big city or your work requires you to live in a certain area. Using these strategies can help reduce the burden of living in an expensive neighborhood. Which one would be easiest for you to apply to your financial life?

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February 17, 2021

Spend Less or Earn More?

Spend Less or Earn More?

What’s the most effective way to meet your financial goals—increasing your income or cutting your spending?

The answer? It depends on your situation. While both strategies can be useful, they’re not interchangeable. Read on to discover the advantages and limitations of each approach… and which one may be right for you.

Spending less: An immediate solution with a fixed floor. There’s no doubt that cutting expenses is the fastest way to move closer to your financial goals. Canceling a streaming service, clipping digital coupons on your phone, and carpooling are simple lifestyle adjustments that take only seconds or minutes to accomplish.

But stricter budgeting can only go so far. Moving back in with your parents, walking to work, and never having fun again may still not be enough. There’s only so much you can cut before you seriously decrease your quality of life!

Earning more: High effort, massive potential. On the surface, increasing your income can seem like a daunting task. Developing your skills, working an extra job and starting a side hustle or business can be labor and time intensive. Furthermore, some of those investments may not pay off immediately—a business or side gig may not generate significant income for weeks, months, or even years!

But those investments also have massive payoff potential. Once you’ve mastered a skill, your earning power is only limited by the market demand for your abilities and your time. And as you grow more and more competent, your potential to earn only increases.

The takeaway? Spending less is a quick and simple move towards your financial goals. But, over the long-term, earning more has far more potential to create the wealth you desire. If you need to quickly increase your cash flow, create a budget and reduce your excess spending. But when your financial situation stabilizes, take inventory of your skills. You might be surprised by how many money earning talents you have, if you take the time to cultivate them!

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February 8, 2021

3 Steps to Reduce Debt with Limited Income

3 Steps to Reduce Debt with Limited Income

Is your income holding you back from paying down debt?

It may feel like necessities such as housing, groceries, and transportation are consuming your cash flow. So how can you pay down debt if you feel like you’re struggling to put food on the table?

Reducing debt with a limited income is certainly a challenge. But if you know the right strategies, it’s an obstacle that you can work to overcome. Read on for tips that can help you pay down debt, regardless of how much you earn.

Budget debt payments first. The next time you sit down to budget, start by allocating money for reducing your debt. It should be your number one priority. Then, budget for essential living expenses like housing, utilities, and groceries. If you need more cash flow, cut down on non-essential spending like dining out and purchasing new clothes.

Start a side gig. If cutting expenses alone doesn’t free up enough cash, explore ways to make more money. That doesn’t always mean starting a second job—after all, this is the golden age of side gigs! Here are just a few hustle ideas for your consideration…

■ Resell books, clothes, and shoes you might pick up from the thrift store on eBay ■ Rideshare or deliver groceries and food ■ House sit, baby sit, or pet sit for friends and neighbors

Ultimately, your ability to earn income is only limited by your creativity in solving problems. What other opportunities are there for you to help others and earn extra income?

Make more than minimum payments. Your debt will linger if you make only minimum payments. That’s because minimum payments are nearly erased by interest. You make a payment, but the interest may put you almost right back where you started.

Instead, choose one debt to eliminate at a time. You should start with the one with the smallest total balance or the highest interest rate. Keep making the minimum payments on your other debts, and target that one debt with the rest of your available financial resources. Once it’s gone, choose the next smallest balance. Rinse and repeat until your debts are gone.

The biggest takeaway is that if you’re working with a limited income, paying off debt has to become your number one financial goal. Devote as much of your budget towards it as possible and increase your earnings if you have to. But it’s well worth the effort—once your debt is gone, you’ll have significantly more income for building real wealth!

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October 5, 2020

What Are The Odds?

What Are The Odds?

Your brain is more powerful than any computer on the planet.

It can store roughly 2.5 million gigabytes of information.¹ Yahoo’s colossal data warehouse can only store 2 million gigabytes.² And your brain does it with the same energy it would take to light a light bulb, not a huge power grid!³ But all that computing firepower still doesn’t help the brain understand one simple concept: probability. Which is unfortunate, because misunderstanding the odds of something happening can seriously impair your decision making, especially when it comes to money and finances. Let’s take a look at the problem of comprehending probability, how it impacts your money, and a simple strategy to counteract it.

We don’t understand probability <br> It’s a scientific fact that humans struggle to properly understand probabilities. A 2018 meta-analysis from the University of Rensburg found that presenting people with probabilities often results in potentially huge errors of judgment.4 For instance, a woman was wrongfully charged with the murder of her sons because a medical professional testified to the low probability of their dying naturally.

Part of the problem is presentation. The meta-analysis showed that presenting tasks as natural frequencies (i.e., 1 out of 10) instead of percentages (10% chance of something happening) actually increased peoples’ performance in understanding the probability they were presented with. Even then, the leap was only from 4% to 24%. You still have merely a 1 in 4 chance of effectively grasping a probability! So while presentation helps, it doesn’t address the deep-seated mental block people have regarding understanding odds. Humans just seem to overcomplicate, misinterpret, and misconstrue probability.

Probability and Money <br> But does that really matter if you’re not buying lottery tickets or spending weekends at the races? You might be surprised by how often our inability to understand chance impacts our money decisions. There are countless examples. You want to start saving and investing your money. You’ve figured out that buying when the market is low is the best way to maximize your dollar. You hold back, waiting to time the market for that dip that’s certainly right around the corner. Perhaps you decide to start a business right when the economy is cooking. The DOW’s been climbing for the last three years, so there’s no reason for it to stop now, right? Or maybe you’ve held off on buying life insurance because the odds of your suddenly passing away are one in a million. Those are all instances of risky behaviors that stem from an innate human inability to grasp probabilities.

How a professional can help <br> But there’s a surprising solution to the probability problem: education. Ask a mathematician to gamble on a coin toss. They’ll choose either heads (or tails) every time. Why? Because they know how probability works and don’t let a few flips throw them off. It’s a 50/50 chance every time the coin is tossed, so why try to game the system? Your personal finances are no different. You need someone on your side who knows the math, knows the economy, and can guide you through a run of bad luck without losing their head. You need a financial professional. They can help you grasp some basics and the strategies that can help protect you from the seeming randomness of finances. Stop rolling the dice. Reach out to a professional today!

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¹ “What is the Memory Capacity of a Human Brain?,” Clinical Neurology Specialists, https://www.cnsnevada.com/what-is-the-memory-capacity-of-a-human-brain/

² “What is the Memory Capacity of a Human Brain?,” Clinical Neurology Specialists, https://www.cnsnevada.com/what-is-the-memory-capacity-of-a-human-brain/

³ “Computation Power: Human Brain vs Supercomputer,” Foglets, 10 Apr, 2019 https://foglets.com/supercomputer-vs-human-brain/#:~:text=The%20amount%20of%20energy%20required,charge%20a%20dim%20light%20bulb

⁴ “Why don’t we understand statistics? Fixed mindsets may be to blame,” ScienceDaily, Oct 12, 2018, https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181012082713.htm

April 6, 2020

The Gig Economy

The Gig Economy

The gig economy is huge.

Almost 36% of workers were involved in the gig economy in 2019, and it seems like that number could grow in the future (1). But what exactly is the gig economy? What even is a gig? And how is it different from what’s existed in the past? Those are the big questions we’ll answer in this blog!

A gig vs. a job <br> Let’s start with the basics. We’ve gotten used to thinking of a job as being something that’s permanent. Older generations might have worked a factory for their whole lives, climbed their way up a promotion ladder, and then retired with company provided benefits. A gig, in comparison, is a job with a certain end date. That might be until a project gets completed, a website gets launched, or until your band wraps up a set at the local bar. It’s temporary by definition. Gigs are still jobs. You provide a service and money changes hands. But they’re very different from what we’ve come to expect jobs should look like.

Digital gigs <br> Gigs have always existed. Old-school mercenaries would sign up to fight until specific contracts expired, jumping from warlord to warlord. But the nature of gigs has changed. When someone talks about a side hustle these days they’re probably describing some kind of pay-by-the-job work they’re doing via an app or the internet. That could be driving for a ride share like Uber, doing design contracts on Upwork, or even finding one-and-done moving jobs on Craigslist!

Technology and shifting mindsets <br> So why now? Why has employment changed so drastically and so quickly? Part of the answer is the massive shift in technology the last decade has seen. A side gig is now just a tap away on your phone. Someone could be freelancing for three different projects during the day and ridesharing at night—all managed on their personal device. Technology has exploded in this way because it’s what a lot of people want. Independence, flexibility, and control have become increasingly important, outweighing traditional values like stability.

It’s hard to tell where the gig economy will take us. It might be a passing phase that fades away, or it might be the norm for years to come. But there’s no doubt that new mindsets and rapidly evolving technology will continue to affect how we relate to employment for years to come.

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January 20, 2020

Tips for Getting Out of Debt

Tips for Getting Out of Debt

Americans owe a whopping amount of debt.

Total consumer debt, for example, tops $4 trillion (1), and the average household owes $6,741 on credit cards alone (2).

Debt can cause a serious drain on your financial life, not to mention increase your stress levels. You may be parting with a big slice of your income just to service the debt—money that could be put to better use to fund things like a home, your own business, or a healthy retirement account.

Fortunately, there are lots of ways to get out of debt. Here are 3 of them…

Create a budget <br> Before you can start digging yourself out of debt, you need to know how you stand with your income versus your outgo every month. Otherwise, you may be sliding deeper into debt as each week passes.

The solution? Create a budget.

First, start tracking your expenses—there are apps you can get on your phone, or even just a notebook and pencil will do. Divide your expenses into categories. This doesn’t have to be complicated. Food, utilities, rent, entertainment, misc. Add them together every week and then every month.

Then, review your spending and compare it with your income. Spending more than you make? That has to be reversed before you’ll ever be able to get out of debt. Make a plan to either reduce your expenses or find a way to raise your income.

If debt payments are driving your expenses above your income, call your lender to see if you can get a plan with lower monthly payments.

Seek out lower interest rates <br> If you’re paying a high interest rate on credit card debt, a good portion of your monthly payment may be going towards interest alone. That means you may not be reducing the principal—the amount you originally borrowed—as much as you could with a lower interest rate. The lower your interest rate, the more your monthly payments can lower your debt—and eventually help you get out of it.

Find out the annual percentage rate (APR) on your current credit card debt by looking at the monthly statements. Then shop around to find any lower interest rates that might be out there. The next step would be to transfer your credit card debt to that new account with the lower rate. The caveat, however, is if any fees you may be charged now or after an introductory period would nullify the savings in interest. Always make sure you understand the terms on a new card before you transfer a balance.

Another option is to apply to a lender for a personal loan to consolidate your high interest rate debt. Personal loans can have interest rates significantly below those on credit cards. Again, make sure you understand any fees, penalties, and terms before you sign up.

Increase your monthly debt payments <br> Now that you’ve got your spending under control, it’s time to see if you can raise your debt payments every month. There are two primary methods to do this.

First, review your expenses to see if you can cut back in some categories. Can you spend a little time each week clipping coupons to reduce your grocery bill? Can you make coffee at home rather than purchasing it at the coffee shop every day? These changes can add up! Review entertainment costs, too. Can you cut out one or more streaming or cable services? It might be a good idea to find introductory offers that can reduce your monthly payments. Check into introductory cell phone offers, too, but always read the fine print so you don’t have any surprise fees or costs down the road.

Second, make a plan to increase your income. Can you ask for a raise at work, make a case for a promotion, or find a higher paying job? If that’s not in the cards, consider working a side gig. A few extra hours a week may increase your monthly income significantly—and help get you out of debt a little faster.

Are you struggling with debt? Get in touch with me and we can work on a strategy for a debt-free future.

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¹ “Consumer debt hits $4 trillion,” Jessica Dickler, CNBC, Feb 21 2019, https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/21/consumer-debt-hits-4-trillion.html

² “2020 American Household Credit Card Debt Study,” Erin El Issa, Nerdwallet, Jan. 12, 2021, https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/average-credit-card-debt-household/

December 9, 2019

The Keys to Paying Your Bills On Time

The Keys to Paying Your Bills On Time

Not paying your bills on time can have significant impacts on financial health including accumulating late fees, penalties, and a negative hit on credit scores.

But maybe you – or a friend – learned about those consequences the hard way. Most late bill payers fall into 1 of 3 camps: they forget to pay on time, they don’t have enough income, or they have enough income but spend it on other things.

In case you – or your friend – are stuck in 1 of these camps, consider the following tips to help pay the bills on time.

I forget to pay my bills on time.
If this is you, you’re actually in a more advantageous position. There are many easy fixes that can help get you back on track.

  1. Use a calendar. This is a tried and true, but often underutilized, method to track your bill due dates. When you get a notice for a bill – either by email, text, or snail mail – jot the due date on your calendar. You can also set a reminder if you use an electronic calendar.
  2. Fiddle with your due dates. Many companies offer flexible due dates. Experiment with what due dates work for you. Some people like to pay their bills all together at the beginning of the month. You may find that you like to pay some bills in the beginning and some in the middle of the month. It’s up to you!
  3. Take advantage of grace period/late fee waivers. If you do forget about a bill and have to make a late payment, give the company a call and ask them to waive the late fee. Late fees can add up, ranging from $10-50 depending on the account. It’s worth a try!

I don’t have the money to pay all my bills.
If your income doesn’t cover your outgo no matter how diligently you pinch those pennies, it won’t matter what type of bill payment method you use, you’re going to have trouble. If you’re in this situation, there are 2 solutions: increase your earnings or decrease your expenses.

  1. Find a side gig. Take a temporary part-time job to make some extra income. Delivering pizza in the evenings or on weekends might be worth doing for a few months to make some extra dough.
  2. Shop around. Shop around for savings. Prices vary on almost everything. Take a little extra time to make sure you’re getting the rock-bottom best prices on your insurance, cable, phone plans, groceries, utilities, etc.

I overspend and don’t have enough left to pay my bills.
Managing income and expenses takes some practice and persistence, but it is doable! If you find yourself consistently overspending without enough left over to cover your bills, try the following:

  1. Create a budget. Get familiar with your income and expenses. This is the only way to know how much disposable income you’re going to end up with every month. You can track your budget daily on an app like PocketGuard, Wallet, or Home Budget.
  2. Stash the money for bills in a separate account. Put your bill money in a separate checking or savings account. This will keep it quarantined from your spending money and help make sure it’s there when the bills come due.

Good Financial Habits
If you feel bill-paying-challenged, or you have a friend who is, try some of the above tips. Taking care of your obligations when you need to can relieve stress, build good credit, and reinforce healthy spending habits for life!

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October 22, 2018

Are you stressed about saving for retirement?

Are you stressed about saving for retirement?

Most of us might feel at least a little anxiety when the subject of preparing for retirement comes up.

Many Americans feel like they haven’t saved enough. In fact, 79% of American workers plan on working longer to make up for what they haven’t saved.[i]

But anticipating staying in the workforce may not be the best strategy when it comes to funding your golden years. Why? Because there are many unforeseen events that can affect your ability (or desire) to work – health problems, caretaking, loss of opportunity in your field… or just wanting to spend time with your grandkids or travel with your partner.

With so much uncertainty, it’s no wonder many Americans feel stressed, burdened, and unprepared when it comes to saving for retirement.

But don’t let retirement worries steal your joy. When it comes to saving for retirement there are a lot of choices you can make to help you prepare. Read on for some principles and tips that may help lessen your stress about the future.

Small changes add up
Retirement saving may seem like an insurmountable task when faced with the high cost of daily life. It’s easy to think we can’t afford to save for retirement and get stuck in a pattern of defeat. But small changes over time can add up to big results.

Shake off despair by implementing small strategies. Consistent saving adds up over time, and it can help build your finance muscle. Read on for some more easy tips.

Direct deposit
Set up a portion of your direct deposit to go straight into a savings account. This is a “set it and forget it” savings strategy, and you’ll be amazed how quickly it can build.

Save found money
Found money is extra cash that comes your way outside of your normal income. It can be from bonuses, gifts, or even a side gig. You weren’t planning on receiving that money anyway, so throw it right into your savings.

Practice frugality
Instead of becoming stressed out and hyper-focused on saving every possible penny, practice frugality. Frugal living can put your energy into something positive – creating a new habit and lifestyle. Also, frugal habits may help prepare you for living on a fixed income during retirement. Try these tips for starters:

Consider downsizing your home
Cut back or eliminate “extras” such as dining out, movies, and concerts When making a purchase, use any available coupons or discount codes Seek sources of free entertainment such as community festivals or neighborhood gatherings

Hire a financial professional
If no matter what you do you still can’t help feeling unprepared and stressed about your retirement, consider hiring a financial professional.

A financial professional may be able to help you change your perspective on preparing for retirement and help empower you with strategies custom made for you.

Remember, financial professionals work with people of all income levels, so don’t hesitate if you need help to get a handle on your retirement. They may assist with:

  • Creating a budget
  • Setting up savings accounts
  • Clarifying your retirement goals
  • Strategies for eliminating debt

Change your perspective on preparing for retirement
If you’re anxious about having enough money for your retirement, try changing your perspective. Focus on small goals and lifestyle habits. Frugality, consistent savings, and solid financial strategies may help take the stress out of retirement planning.

Consistency over time is the name of the game with retirement savings. So implement a few strategies that you can live with now.

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September 3, 2018

Retiring Boomers: Can You Afford the Long Life You’ve Been Hoping For?

Retiring Boomers: Can You Afford the Long Life You’ve Been Hoping For?

As Baby Boomers retire or prepare to retire, there’s good news and bad news. The good news is Baby Boomers are living much longer – into their 80s. The bad news is that many aren’t financially prepared to handle the gift of a long life.

Can You Afford the Long Life You’ve Been Hoping For?
In 1900 the average lifespan was 47 years – nowadays, that’s just about midlife. The average life expectancy in 2018 is about 80. This means if you’re planning on retiring at 65, you may have another two decades to go. And that means you must have another two decades of income.

A long life is a blessing, but a long life without enough money? That might be a curse.

Baby Boomer Retirement by the Numbers
According to a study by the Insured Retirement Institute – a trade association for the retirement income industry – surprisingly, many Boomers are not financially prepared for retirement.

  • 24 percent of Boomers have no retirement savings
  • 55 percent have some retirement savings
  • 42 percent of those with some retirement savings have less than $100,000

There are a few reasons Baby Boomers are coming up short on retirement savings. Many were heavily invested during the 2008 crash and never fully recovered. Boomers were also the first generation to be tasked with saving for retirement largely on their own. Company pensions were already declining, and the rise of the 401(k) plan was underway.

Also, wages have stagnated, and interest rates have declined. Add to this a relaxed approach to retirement savings and it’s no wonder Baby Boomers are struggling with their retirement funds.

Creative Ways Boomers are Boosting Retirement Savings
Baby Boomers are nothing if not self-reliant, and many are handling their retirement dilemma in some creative ways…

  • Staying in the workforce: Some Boomers keep working for the extra income, while others enjoy their work and aren’t ready to give it up entirely.
  • Side gigs: Boomers are taking on the gig economy – earning extra cash by working part-time or through contract.
  • Alternative lifestyles: Some Boomers have decided to stretch their retirement dollars by living in another country where the dollar goes further. Others are forgoing the expense of homeownership for full-time RV travel or living on a sailboat.

Good Planning Gives You Good Options
Whatever you decide to do during your retirement years, the better prepared you are the more choices you’ll have. Whether you’re a young Boomer still in the workforce, or if you’re already living off your retirement savings, financial planning is key.

Contact a professional today to make sure you’re getting the most out of your retirement.

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