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September 28, 2020

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Jonathan Brutto

Jonathan Brutto

Financial Professional

15150 Preston Rd Suite 300

Dallas, TX 75248

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July 29, 2020

Tips For Working At Home

Tips For Working At Home

You’ve most likely become a work-at-home pro over the last few months.

At this point you’re probably perfectly comfortable with your routine and feel like you’re highly productive!

But you also might need a refresher on some working at home basics. Even at the office—where you’re more likely to be held accountable—it’s easy to slide into bad habits. Here’s a quick rundown of some tips to help you get back in your groove!

Start strong
Sleeping in is almost always a temptation. Crawling out of bed, hitting the snooze button until it breaks, and rushing out the door just feel like a routine to many of us! Working from home can compound this. Suddenly, you have the luxury of peacefully sleeping until 8:55am, making some tasteless instant coffee, and booting up your laptop in your PJs right before your 9 o’clock video call. Sounds like the life, right?

But this ritual of jumping right from your mattress to your dining room table/temporary desk can have serious drawbacks. Staring at a computer screen while barely keeping your eyelids open is an incredibly uninspiring way to start a day. It’s much better to do things that help you wake up and get your mind focused. Make breakfast! Go for a walk! Meditate! Use that time you would normally spend looking at brake lights for something productive.

Make a workspace
Homes are (hopefully) relaxing. They’re where we go at the end of a long, stressful day to binge watch shows, eat delicious food, and spend time with our families and friends. Those associations can make working from home tricky. You might notice that the temptations to watch TV, talk to a roommate, or reorganize your kitchen for the 100th time are interfering with your job performance.

The solution to this problem is to create a workspace in your home that is dedicated to being productive. Remind your family that you love them, but that you’ll need some space when you’re in your home office. Move TVs and other distractions out and create a place where you can focus. And it’s probably wise to avoid setting yourself up in your bedroom unless absolutely necessary!

Always communicate
One of the biggest downsides of working at home is that it can strain communication with your coworkers. On one hand, that’s probably not awful. Less chatter with your office buddies about the latest reality TV show might be a welcome productivity booster! But collaborating with your team, getting approvals from bosses, and receiving feedback are essential parts of getting projects done and growing your skillset.

So don’t go off the grid. Stay in touch with your colleagues. Ask your boss for feedback. Get advice from your mentors. Staying vocal keeps work moving forward, it keeps you socialized and feeling accomplished, and it reminds the higher-ups that you still exist!

Whether you’ve finally decided to upgrade your work-at-home game or you just needed a reminder, try out these tips and let me know how it goes!

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July 27, 2020

Power Naps

Power Naps

It’s 3:00 pm on a Wednesday and you’re running out of steam.

You didn’t get much sleep last night and keeping your eyes open feels impossible. The energy drinks and coffees and caffeine pills gave you a quick boost in the morning, but your yawns are getting deeper and that stack of papers is starting to look like a comfy pillow. What can you do?

It turns out that a quick power nap might be the solution to your midday energy slump. But there’s an art and a science to productive sleep. Here’s a quick guide to power naps!

The science of sleep
Sleep is surprisingly complicated. Even though we all need it to function and survive, scientists haven’t been able to figure out exactly why our bodies and brains have to shut down for about 8 hours every night. Theories exist (you can read those here), but there’s no definitive answer. For the purpose of power naps, what’s important is understanding what happens while you sleep.

Your body goes through 4 different stages while it sleeps. The first three are essentially your body’s transitioning from a light sleep (stage 1) to a deep sleep (stage 3). These are followed by the Rapid Eye Movement (REM) stage. This is when your brain processes information and when most people experience dreams. You then start the cycle over at stage one and repeat. A full four stage cycle happens over about 90 minutes, and it occurs multiple times when you get the recommended 8 hours of sleep.

The art of power naps
The key to nap powerfully is to control when you wake up in the sleep cycle. The goal is to wake up during the lightest stage of sleep. That normally occurs within 20 to 30 minutes after drifting off. Anything more than that will have you waking up in the middle of a deep stage of sleep. Ever emerge from a nap feeling like you’re on a different planet? Then you know how awful waking up too far into a sleep cycle can feel!

The benefit of power naps
A quick nap that doesn’t go through all the sleep cycles can have big benefits. It can boost alertness and motor function for up to two to three hours.(1) And it normally doesn’t produce the stress-inducing and hyperactive side effects of caffeine. Naps that go over 30 minutes can still have benefits as well, despite the grogginess.(2)

The greatest drawback of the power nap is how inconvenient it can be in an office setting. But if you find yourself working at home, it might be worth developing a nap routine. Skip the mid-afternoon coffee, let everyone know you’ll be unavailable for around 30 minutes, get some quick shut-eye and see how it goes!

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March 25, 2020

Morning Routines Of Winners

Morning Routines Of Winners

Mornings are rough.

Waking up from sweet sleep to a blaring alarm is never fun, especially if you’re dreading the day ahead. But there’s a better way to approach those opening hours. Here are some tips for getting a step ahead in the morning and building momentum to carry you through the day.

Wake up early
Waking up early is easier said than done. The snooze button is all too enticing when we’ve stayed up the night before and want “just ten more minutes” of peaceful sleep. But it’s also the enemy of having productive mornings. Resetting your sleep schedule and waking up (and actually getting out of bed) earlier means that you have more time for yourself every day. You start off in total control of how you spend your time instead of scurrying around trying to get ready for work. It’s not easy, but an investment in your morning is one of the best decisions you can make!

Eat breakfast
Starting off your morning with a healthy breakfast gives you the energy you need to rev up. It fuels your body and brain to make the most of those early hours. Who wants to wake up at the crack of dawn and try to get stuff done only to be starving the whole time?

Plan out your day
Mapping out your day has a few benefits. Structure is almost always a good thing. Being able to clearly see what needs to be done and when can help you prioritize and make sure things don’t slip through the cracks. But seeing a problem on paper sometimes takes the dread out of it and makes it more mentally manageable. That’s sometimes all you need to get out there and conquer a problem.

Just remember that it takes time to reset your sleep schedule. Make sure that you avoid screens before bedtime, hit the hay early, and avoid caffeine late in the day. Start moving your alarm earlier every week and be patient! Apply some of these tips and you’ll be going on the offensive every morning in no time.

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March 23, 2020

Are Gym Memberships Worth It?

Are Gym Memberships Worth It?

Let’s face it—we’ve all botched a New Year’s fitness resolution.

Sure, we started the year with great intentions and a few gym visits, but it didn’t take long for our resolve to waver and we never returned. However, many of us have kept that membership around. After all, we paid so much to sign up that we might as well hold on to it just in case our motivation comes back, right?

Wrong.

It turns out that gym membership might have been a bad value right from the start. But how can you tell? Here’s a few things to consider if you’re thinking about finally moving on from your overly ambitious New Year’s resolution.

How gym memberships work
Gym memberships seem pretty simple on the surface; you pay once a month for access to gym equipment during operating hours. But annual fees and initiation fees can add up pretty quickly, meaning that you can potentially sink hundreds of dollars into a gym. National gym chains may range in price from $164 to $1,334 per year, but the national average comes out to $696 annually. Plus, some gyms make you sign a contract locking you into a year-long membership. You have to pay for the membership regardless if you work out!

The big question: Are you paying for something you won’t use?
Gym memberships are more cost effective the more you take advantage of them. Going to the gym seven times a week at an average priced gym? Let’s do the math. You’ll pay $1.90 per visit. Go four times per week? $3.36 (1).

But let’s say you visit the gym about four times per month for an hour-long sweat session. You’ll wind up spending $14.50 per hour! To put that in perspective, we spend an average of $0.28 on Netflix per hour. Sitting around watching TV is far more cost effective than working out.

Alternatives to gym memberships
So what can you do if you want to get fit but don’t want the potential financial black hole of a gym membership? It’s often cheaper in the long run to build your own gym at home rather than getting a membership. You also might want to see if your apartment or office has a serviceable gym. If all else fails, you can always do body weight exercises. You might be surprised by how grueling and intense push-ups and squats can be!

The bottom line is that the keys to making your gym membership worth it are motivation and discipline. The cost of buying a membership isn’t enough incentive (2). You have to find a deeper drive to get you in the gym week in and week out. Check out the costs of your local gym, weigh the alternatives, and ask yourself why you want to start working out before you sign that contract!

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March 18, 2020

Hard Skills vs. Soft Skills

Hard Skills vs. Soft Skills

Soft skills are having a moment.

Employers are realizing that there are some tasks that computers actually can’t do—at least not yet! So the words soft skills have started getting a lot of traction. One survey found that 92% of employers value soft skills as much as hard skills (1)! But what exactly is a soft skill? For that matter, what’s a hard skill? Let’s take a closer look at these two different types of abilities!

Hard Skills
A hard skill is quantifiable. You can typically learn them through taking a class or reading a book. They’re almost always technically skills that can be used in very specific circumstances. For instance, knowing how to design a website or retrieve data are hard skills; they’re very narrow types of knowledge that require training and technical proficiency to master. Engineers, doctors, and accountants are just a few examples of jobs that are based around hard skills.

Soft Skills
Defining soft skills is more tricky. Have you ever met a leader whose vision inspires you to work harder? Or have a coworker who’s able to rise above a stressful situation and keep a level head? Those are all examples of soft skills. They’re essentially people skills applied to the workplace.

Which one is more important?
It’s tempting to think that hard skills dominate the economy. The digital revolution is changing the way we interact with the world and tech related hard skills are becoming essential in more and more fields. But that doesn’t mean soft skills are going anywhere; one study from LinkedIn found that 57% of employers value soft skills more than hard skills! (2)

It’s easy to see why. A room full of super geniuses armed with quantum computers is useless if they can’t communicate effectively and don’t have a plan! Skills like leadership, conflict resolution, and stress management are just as important as ever and employers know it.

So let’s say you’re looking for a job and you’ve started working on a resume. How do you highlight both your hard skills and your soft skills? Hard skills often shine the most on paper. Portfolios, degrees, certifications, and recommendations all demonstrate that you’re actually proficient.

Soft skills tend to come out in interviews. Make sure you show up early and dress professionally. Making eye contact, smiling when appropriate, and asking thoughtful questions can all show that you’re the type of person who works well on a team and won’t start unnecessary drama. Those little things may seem insignificant if you’ve got a Ph.D from a top university with years of experience under your belt, but you might be surprised by how much they matter to employers and your coworkers!

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March 16, 2020

Can You Buy Happiness?

Can You Buy Happiness?

Let’s face it: There’s a relationship between money and happiness.

Anyone who’s looked at their savings account during a market correction or has lived paycheck to paycheck knows that not having enough money can be incredibly stressful. But there’s also a fair chance that you know of someone who’s wealthy (i.e., seems to have plenty of money) but is often miserable. So what exactly is the relationship between money and happiness? Let’s start by looking a little closer at happiness.

Happiness is really complicated
There is no single key to happiness. Close relationships, exercise, and stress management all may play a role in increasing emotional well-being. Little things like journaling, going on a walk, and listening to upbeat music can also help lift your mood. But none of those factors alone makes you happy—most of them actually turn out to be interrelated. It’s hard to maintain strong personal relationships if you take out your work stress on your friends! Assuming that money alone will outweigh a bad relationship, high stress, and an unhealthy lifestyle is a skewed mindset.

Money contributes to happiness
That being said, money can certainly contribute to happiness. For one, It’s a metric we use to figure out how much we’ve accomplished in our lives. It helps to boost confidence in our achievements if we’ve been handsomely rewarded. But more importantly, the absence of money can be a huge cause of dismay. It’s easy to see why; constantly wondering if you can pay your bills, fending off debt collectors, and worrying about retirement can take a serious emotional toll. In fact, having more money essentially only supports greater emotional well-being until you reach an income of about $75,000 (1). People felt better about how much they had accomplished past that point, but their day-to-day emotional lives pretty much stayed the same.

What’s the takeaway?
In short, you can’t technically buy happiness. However, taking control of your financial life definitely has emotional benefits. You may increase your feeling of wellbeing if your income gets boosted to a point, but it’s not a silver bullet that will solve all of your problems. Instead, try to think of your finances as one of the many factors in your life that has to be balanced with things like friendship, adventure, and generosity.

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March 11, 2020

3 Tricks to Boost Your Confidence

3 Tricks to Boost Your Confidence

Confidence is an essential life skill.

It empowers you to put yourself out there, take necessary risks, and inspire others to meet their full potential. But many of us face hesitation about how much we can accomplish. Much of the time, our confidence gets outvoted by our doubt and we take the path of least resistance. Here are a few ways to start developing your self confidence and tip the scale in favor of boldness instead of apprehension.

Expand your horizons
Challenging yourself is the foundation of confidence. It’s not easy. Embracing uncomfortable situations and pushing yourself to the outer limits of your abilities can be intimidating. But it’s also essential for building your confidence. Proving to yourself that you can do difficult things and overcome challenges changes the way you perceive yourself. You stop seeing impossible odds and start realizing that you’re a lot tougher than you might have thought. Obstacles get replaced by opportunities.

Start with little challenges and work your way up. Achieving those little victories is the spark that will jumpstart your journey towards greater self-confidence!

Exercise
Working out is good for you, plain and simple. But exercise doesn’t just improve your physical health; it does wonders for your self-image and mental health. It can reduce stress and anxiety, unleash positive chemicals in your brain, and increase feelings of self-worth (1). Plus, seeing positive changes in your physical appearance can be one of the biggest confidence boosters around!

Your appearance
Along the same lines, changing up your wardrobe a little and trying something new is an easy way of boosting your confidence. Looking in the mirror and seeing shabby hair and a faded t-shirt covering a slouching body is hardly inspiring for you or anyone else. Upping your fashion game, trying out a new style, and improving your posture are simple ways to help boost your confidence. A compliment about how you’re dressed can do wonders for your mood. That’s not to say that you should obsess over your looks and spiral out if you spot a pimple, but switching up your look can sometimes give you the self-image surge you need to make big plays!

You can’t fake confidence. People can see through chest puffing and bravado. True confidence takes time to cultivate. But these simple tips are great starting points as you strive for self-assurance. Just remember that there’s nothing wrong with starting small and building towards bigger goals at your own pace, whether that’s at work or in the gym.

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March 9, 2020

Public Speaking Tips

Public Speaking Tips

Fear of public speaking is common and can be intense.

Some surveys have even suggested that we’re more scared of it than dying (1)! But giving a presentation or leading or speaking up at a meeting doesn’t have to be scary. Here are a few tips that will take your public speaking game to the next level.

Prepare and practice
Preparation is key for successful public speaking. That means doing thorough research beforehand on your presentation topic. Keep your speech simple and create a solid outline. That might mean you write everything down word for word or you keep a few bullet points handy. Just make sure you have a clear idea of what you want to say and at what point in your talk you’re going to say it. Once you’ve gotten the content of your speech sorted, start practicing it. Test run it on your spouse, your dog, or even in the mirror. This will give you an idea of which ideas or phrases are working, if your outline flows, and if you have any nervous ticks you need to address!

It’s also helpful to visit the venue before presenting if possible. Get to know the room you’ll be speaking in and what kind of setup you’ll need. It’s also a chance to rehearse in the actual place you’ll be speaking, which can be a big confidence booster!

But even a researched and practiced speech can fail if you don’t connect with your audience. Doing those things can help you feel more sure of yourself, but they’re not enough on their own to sway a crowd. How you talk and your body language are just as important as your prep work.

Speak slowly and build suspense
Fast talkers can be overwhelming in any situation. Blasting through your speech can sometimes indicate excitement, but more often it makes it hard to keep up with, which may create confusion and irritation. Plus, it could be a sign that you’re nervous and jittery, which can be distracting for audience members. Try slowing down when you’re speaking to a crowd. It gives listeners time to digest everything you’re saying and communicates confidence. You can bring your speed down even more for important points. It’s a way to help your audience focus on what you’re saying and hang on every word!

Eye contact
Let’s face it. Eye contact can be weird. Unflinching and unbroken eye contact is enough to make any of us uncomfortable. But eye contact in moderation can establish trust and show that we’re actually listening. As a speaker, it helps build a connection between you and your audience, helping them be more receptive to what you’re saying. Don’t go on stage and look at your shoes or just scan back and forth through the crowd. Choose one person at a time and establish eye contact with them for a few seconds while you speak and then move on. It’s an easy way of letting a listener know you’re talking to them specifically! Just don’t stare at one person in the crowd. The victim of your ocular assault will feel uncomfortable and the rest of your audience will feel ignored, weirded out, or, most likely, a combination of both.

There’s a reason public speaking is scary. We’re social animals, and the potential of humiliating ourselves in front of a crowd goes against everything we’re hardwired to do. But there’s no better way of overcoming fear than with preparation and then confronting it. Try these tips out the next time you’re nervous about giving a presentation or leading a meeting. You might be surprised how far they go in making your next speech one to remember—in a good way!

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