Your Life Insurance Rate & You: How Gender Factors In

July 17, 2019

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Luis Puente

Luis Puente

Educator and District Leader

2711 LBJ Freeway Suite 300

Farmers Branch, TX 75234

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January 7, 2019

Read this before you walk down the aisle

Read this before you walk down the aisle

Don’t let financial trouble ruin your future wedded bliss.

Most newlyweds have a lot to get used to. You may be living together for the first time, spending a lot of time with your new in-laws, and dealing with dual finances. Financial troubles can plague even the most compatible pairs, so read on for some tips on how to get your newlywed finances off to the best possible start.

Talk it out
If you haven’t done this already, the time is ripe for a heart to heart talk about what your financial picture is going to look like. This is the time to lay it all out. Not only should you and your fiancé discuss your upcoming combined financial situation, but it can be beneficial to take a deep dive into your past too. Our financial histories and backgrounds can influence current spending and saving habits. Take some time to get to know one another’s history and perspective when it comes to how they think about money, debt, budgeting, etc.

Newlyweds need a budget
Everyone needs a budget, but a budget can be particularly helpful for newlyweds. A reasonable, working household budget can go a long way in helping ease financial stress and overcoming challenges. Money differences can be a big cause of marital strife, but a solid, mutually-agreed-upon budget can help avoid potential arguments. A budget will help you manage student loans or new household expenses that must be dealt with. Come up with a budget together and make sure it’s something you both can stick with.

Create financial goals
Financial goal setting can actually be fun. True, some goals may not seem all that exciting – like paying off credit cards or student loans. But formulating financial goals is important.

Financial goal setting should start with a conversation with your new fiancé. This is the time to think about your future as a married couple and work out a financial strategy to help make your financial dreams a reality. For example, if you want to buy a house, you’ll need to prepare for that. A good start is to minimize debt and start saving for a down payment.

Maybe you two want to start a business. In that case, your financial goals may include raising capital, establishing business credit, or qualifying for a small business loan.

Face your debt head on
It’s not unusual for individuals to start married life facing new debt that came along with their partner – possibly student loans or personal credit card debt. You may also have combined debt if you’re planning on financing your wedding. Maybe you’re going to take your dream honeymoon and put it on a credit card.

Create a strategy to pay off your debt and stick to it. There are two common ways to tackle it – begin with the highest interest rate debt, or begin with the smallest balance. There are many good strategies – the key is to develop one and put it into action.

Invest for the future
Part of your financial strategy should include preparing for retirement, even though it might seem light years away now. Make sure you work a retirement strategy into your other financial goals. Take advantage of employer-sponsored retirement accounts and earmark savings for retirement.

Purchase life insurance
Life insurance is essential to help ensure your new spouse will be taken care of should you die prematurely. Even though many married couples today are dual earners, there is still a need for life insurance. Ask yourself if your new spouse could afford to pay their living expenses if something happened to you. Consider purchasing a life insurance policy to help cover things like funeral costs, medical expenses, or replacement income for your spouse.

Newlywed finances can be fun
Newlywed life is fun and exciting, and finances can be too. Talk deeply and often about finances with your fiancé. Share your dreams and goals so you can create financial habits together that will help you realize them. Here’s to you and many years of wedded bliss!

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November 5, 2018

How to have your dream wedding without nightmare spending

How to have your dream wedding without nightmare spending

Planning a wedding is both exciting and stressful. There are many moving parts to coordinate – guest lists, venues, menus.

Not to mention the fact that you’re making some major financial decisions – maybe your first as a couple. Needless to say, your wedding is a huge milestone. It’s easy to get caught up in the wave of excitement. But it’s also easy to go overboard with spending. One day you get engaged and the next thing you know, you’re looking at your wedding album (along with some potentially major credit card bills).

To keep your wedding costs as reasonable as possible, consider a fresh perspective. Read on for a few pointers to keep in mind as you embark on this new adventure.

Take the time to get your mind in the game
When you first commit to walk down the aisle together, it may be tempting to rush right out and buy your fantasy dress, secure the location where you’ll exchange your vows, and get your order in for your dream wedding cake. But slowing down a little and thinking about what would really make your day special can help corral your wedding costs (so you’ll have that much more for a down payment on your first home, for example).

Set a budget and stick to it
The average cost of a wedding in the United States is more than $33,000.[i] But don’t panic. You don’t have to spend $33,000 to have an unforgettable day. You’ve probably been to wonderful weddings that cost less than $1,000 as well as huge ballroom style weddings that can approach six figures.

Spend as much or as little as you can afford. The important point is to set a budget and stick to it. So sit down with your partner and create a budget you can live with, not just for the day itself, but for your future together. Decide on your most important elements, set the costs for them, and get started checking items off your list!

Spend only on what’s important to you
One thing to keep in mind is that this is your day. Your wedding doesn’t have to be all things to all people. What is most important to you and your fiancé? Love gourmet food? Maybe you splurge a bit on your menu. Into fashion? Maybe your attire is the big ticket item. Don’t care much for alcohol? Skip it and budget more money toward the DJ.

Call in favors and use your friends’ talents
Enlisting help from your friends not only can save money on wedding costs, but it can also make your wedding feel more personal and special. Gather up your talented friends and ask for their help.

Ask close friends to participate in the wedding prep instead of purchasing gifts. Acquaintances? Ask them if they will share their expertise for a minimal fee.

Hint: If your style is more casual, skip the professional photographer and ask your guests to take pictures with their smartphones. You can save a ton of money and end up with great true-to-life photos of your wedding (instead of professional portraits that might look a bit stuffy).

Stay calm and plan on
If you begin planning without a clear vision for how you want your day to unfold, you can quickly get caught up in the frenzy. Vendors and party planners will be happy to sell you lots of extras you may not want or need. So, think carefully about your plan, know it well, and stick to it as execution gets underway.

In short, the best way to save money on your wedding isn’t about cutting corners and limiting your guest list. Like any financial matter, it’s about knowing what’s important to you, setting a budget, and getting creative. Not only can this help save money on your wedding, but it also ensures a wedding that is uniquely yours. And the best news? Having some money left over for the honeymoon!

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[i] https://www.theknot.com/content/average-wedding-cost-2017

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