Headed in the Right Direction: Managing Debt for Millennials

June 12, 2019

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Kristen & Ed Judd

Kristen & Ed Judd

Executive Vice Presidents

11098 Raleigh Ct

Westminster, CO 80031

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June 12, 2019

Headed in the Right Direction: Managing Debt for Millennials

Headed in the Right Direction: Managing Debt for Millennials

Three simple words can strike fear into the heart of any millennial:

Student.

Loan.

Debt.

The anxiety is not surprising: Members of the Class of 2017 had an average of $39,400 in student loan debt.

Nearly $40 grand? For that you could travel the world. Put a down payment on a house. Buy a car. Even start a new business! But instead of having the freedom to pursue their dreams, there’s a hefty financial ball and chain around millennials’ feet.

That many young people owing that much money before they even enter the workforce? It’s unbelievable!

Now just imagine adding car payments, house payments, insurance premiums, and more on top of that student debt. No wonder millennials are feeling so terrible: studies show that graduates with debt experience feelings of shame, panic, and anxiety. Now is the time to get ahead of your debt. Not later. Not when it’s more convenient or feels less shameful. You have the potential right now to manage that debt and get out from under it.

So how do you get out from under your debt? Sometimes improving your current situation involves more than making smarter choices with the money you earn now. Getting out of that debt ditch means finding a way to make more.

There are 2 things you can monetize right now:

  • Your education
  • Your experience

Both have their own challenges. You may not have spent much time in a particular field yet, so not a lot of experience. And what if you’re working a job that has nothing to do with your major? There goes education.

Two speed bumps. One right after the other. But you can still gain momentum in the direction you want your life to go!

How? A solid financial strategy. A goal you can see. A destination for financial independence.

Debts can become overwhelming – remember that stat up there? But with a strategy in mind for the quick and consistent repaying of your loans, so much of that stress and burden could be lifted.

Contact me today. A quick phone call is all we need to help get you rolling in the direction YOU want to go.

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December 17, 2018

How much will this cost me?

How much will this cost me?

If you’re dipping your toe in the pool of life insurance for the first time, you’re bound to have a lot of questions.

At the top of your list is probably how much setting up a policy is going to cost you.

There are several things that can determine how much you’ll pay for life insurance, including the type of policy you select. But before we dive in and look at cost, let’s check out the types of life insurance available.

Major types of life insurance
Life insurance is customizable and can suit many different needs, but for the most part, life insurance comes in three main varieties.

Term life insurance: A term life policy is active for a preselected length of time. It could be 15, 20, or 30 years. If something happens to you during that term, your beneficiary will receive the death benefit of the policy.

Permanent life insurance: Permanent life insurance is a policy that stays active as long as you’re alive. When you pass away, the policy pays out to your named beneficiary. The value of the policy increases over time, and you can borrow against this “cash value” in some circumstances.

Universal life insurance: Universal life insurance works like a permanent life policy in that it pays out to your beneficiary, but it also accrues interest over the policy term (which may be affected by market performance).

How your cost is calculated
The insurance company estimates the cost of a life insurance policy based on your risk factors. Risk factor data is gathered and evaluated based on the information in your application. Then the insurance company uses historical data, trends, and actuarial processes to come up with a premium for you.

The cost of some life insurance policies can change over time, while others remain the same.

What risk factors does the company use?
When the insurance company is calculating your rate, they look at several factors, including:

Your demographics: Your demographics include your age, weight, gender, and health. The company will also want to know if you smoke, and other health-related issues you may have.

The amount of the death benefit: The death benefit is the amount the policy will pay to your beneficiaries when you pass away. The larger the death benefit you select, the more expensive the policy.

Your lifestyle: Lifestyle habits and hobbies can affect the cost of your policy. The insurance company will want to know if you ride a motorcycle regularly, or how often you drink alcohol, for example.

Your risk and life insurance cost
The risk of when your death will occur ultimately determines your life insurance costs. That’s why the younger you are the less the policy should cost. If you wait to purchase your life insurance policy when you’re older, the policy will most likely cost more.

But there are things you can do that may help lessen the cost of the policy. Anything that will increase your health status may help with your life insurance costs. Quitting smoking and starting a regular exercise program can promote your health and in turn this may also have a positive effect on your health insurance premium.

A life insurance agent can help
If you’re looking for a life insurance policy and wondering about the cost, a qualified life insurance agent can be a great help. A life insurance agent has access to many different insurance companies and can work to get you matched with the right policy at the right price for you.

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This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to promote any certain products, plans, or strategies for saving and/or investing that may be available to you. Market performance is based on many factors and cannot be predicted. Before investing or enacting a savings or retirement strategy, seek the advice of a financial professional, accountant, and/or tax expert to discuss your options.

December 10, 2018

How young people can use life insurance

How young people can use life insurance

Sometimes life insurance doesn’t get the credit it deserves.

Most of us know it’s used to replace income if the worst were to happen, but that’s about it. If you’re in your twenties and just starting out on your own, especially if you’re single or don’t have kids yet, you might be thinking that getting a life insurance policy is something to put off until later in life.

On closer inspection however, life insurance can be a multi-faceted financial tool that has many interesting applications for your here-and-now. In fact, there’s probably a life insurance policy for most every person or situation.

Read on for some uses of life insurance you may be able to take advantage of when you’re young – you might find some interesting surprises!

Loan collateral: If you have your eye on entrepreneurship, life insurance can be of great service. Some types of business loans may require you to have a life insurance policy as collateral. If you have an eye on starting a business and think you may need a business loan, put a life insurance policy into place.

Pay off debt: A permanent life insurance policy has cash value. This is the amount the policy is worth should you choose to cash it in before the death benefit is needed. If you’re in a financial bind with debt – maybe from unexpected medical expenses or some other emergency you weren’t anticipating – using the cash value on the policy to pay off the debt may be an option. Some policies will even let you borrow against this cash value and repay it back with interest. (Note: If you’re thinking about utilizing the cash benefit of your life insurance policy, talk to a financial professional about the consequences.)

Charitable spending: If a certain cause or charity is near and dear to you, consider using the death benefit of a life insurance policy as a charitable gift. You can select your favorite charity or nonprofit organization and list them as a beneficiary on your life insurance policy. This will allow them to receive a tax-free gift when you pass away.

Leave a legacy of wealth: A life insurance policy can serve as a legacy to your beneficiaries. Consider purchasing a life insurance policy to serve as an inheritance. This is a good option if you are planning on using most or all of your savings during your non-working retirement years.

Mortgage down payment: The cash value of a whole life policy may be able to be used for large expenses, such as home buying. A whole life policy can serve as a down payment on a home – for you or for your children or grandchildren.

Key man insurance: Key man insurance is a useful tool for businesses. A key person is someone in your business with proprietary knowledge or some other business knowledge on which your business depends.

A business may purchase a life insurance policy on a key man (or woman) to help the business navigate the readjustment should that person die unexpectedly. A life insurance policy can help the business bridge that time and potential downturn in income, and help cover expenses to deal with the loss.

Financing college education: With the rising cost of college tuition, many families are looking for tools to finance their children’s college education. You may consider using the cash value of your life insurance policy to help with college tuition. Just remember to account for any possible tax implications you may incur.

Life insurance policies have many uses. There are great applications for young people, business owners, and just about anyone. Talk to a financial professional about your financial wishes to see how a life insurance policy can work for you.

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Read all of your policy documents carefully so that you understand what situations your policies cover or don’t cover. This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to promote any certain products, plans, or strategies for saving and/or investing that may be available to you. Before purchasing an insurance policy, seek the advice of a financial professional, accountant, and/or tax expert to discuss your options and the consequences with use of the policy.

November 26, 2018

Dig yourself out of debt

Dig yourself out of debt

I hate to break it to you, but no matter what generation you are – Baby Boomer, Generation X, or Millennial – you’re probably in debt.

If you’re not – good on you! Keep doing what you’re doing.

But if you are in debt, you’re not alone. A study[i] by the financial organization, Comet, found:

  • 80.9 percent of Baby Boomers are in debt
  • 79.9 percent of Generation X is in debt
  • 81.5 percent of Millennials are in debt

There are some folks whose goal is to eliminate all debt – and if that’s yours, great! But one thing to keep in mind while you’re working towards that finish line is that not all debt is created equal. Carrying a mortgage, for example, may be considered a “healthy” debt. Student loan debt may feel like an encumbrance, but hopefully, your education has given you more earning power in the workforce. A car loan may even be considered a healthy debt. So, there are some types of debt that may offer you advantages.

Any credit card debt you have, however, should be dealt with asap. Credit card debt can cost money every month in the form of interest, and it gives you nothing in return – no equity, no education, no increase in earning potential. It’s like throwing money down the drain.

So, let’s get to work and look at some of the best tips for paying down credit card debt.

1. Get to know your debt
Make a commitment to be honest with yourself. If you’re in denial, it’s going to be hard to make positive changes. So take a good, hard look at your debt. Examine your credit card statements and note balances, interest rates, minimum monthly payment amounts, and due dates. Once you have this information down in black and white you can start to create a repayment strategy.

2. Get motivated
Taking on your debt isn’t easy. Most of us would rather not confront it. We may make half-hearted attempts to pay it off but never truly get anywhere. Need a little motivation? Getting rid of your credit card debt may make you happier. The Comet study asked respondents to rate their happiness on a scale of one to seven.[ii] It turns out that those who selected the lowest rating also carried the highest amounts of credit card debt. Want to be happier? It seems like paying off your credit card debt may help!

3. Develop your strategy
There are many strategies for paying off your credit card debt. Once you understand all your debt and have found your motivation, it’s time to pick a strategy. There are two main strategies for debt repayment. One focuses on knocking out the highest interest debt first, and the other method begins with tackling the smallest principal balances first. Here’s how they work:

  • Start with the highest interest rate: One of the items you should have noted when you did your debt overview is the interest rate for each account. With this method, you’ll throw the largest payment you can at your highest interest rate debt every month, while paying the minimum payments on your other debts. Utilizing this method may help you pay less interest over time.

  • Start with the smallest balance: As opposed to comparing interest rates, this method requires you to look at your balances. With this strategy, you’ll begin paying the smallest balance off first. Continue to make the minimum payments on your other accounts and put as much money as you can towards the smallest balance. Once you have that one paid off, combine the amount you were paying on that balance with the minimum you were paying on your next smallest balance, and so on. This strategy can help keep you motivated and encouraged since you should start to see some results right away.

Either strategy can work well. Pick the one that seems best for you, execute, and most importantly – don’t give up!

4. Live by a budget
As you begin chipping away at your credit card debt, it’s important to watch your spending. If you continue to charge purchases, you won’t see the progress you’re making, so watch your spending closely. If you don’t have a budget already, now would be a good time to create one.

5. Think extra payments
Once you are committed to paying off your debt and have developed your strategy, keep it top of mind. Make it your number one financial priority. So when you come across “found” money – like work bonuses or gifts – see it as an opportunity to make an extra credit card payment. The more of those little extra payments you make, the better. Make them while the cash is in hand, so you aren’t tempted to spend it on something else.

6. Celebrate your victories
Living on a budget and paying off debt can feel tedious. Paying off debt takes time. Don’t forget to take pride in what you’re trying to accomplish. Celebrate your milestones. Do something special when you get that first small balance paid off, but try to make the occasion free or at least cheap! The point is to reward yourself for your hard financial work. (Hint: Try putting up a chart or calendar in your kitchen and marking off your progress as you go!)

Reward yourself with a debt-free life Getting out of debt is a great reward in and of itself. It takes discipline, persistence, and patience, but it can be done. Come to terms with your debt, formulate a strategy, and stick to it. Your financial future will thank you!

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[i] & [ii] https://www.cometfi.com/details-of-debt

October 1, 2018

What Millennials can learn from Generation Z

What Millennials can learn from Generation Z

Millennials have been praised for having good financial habits despite facing some difficult economic challenges.

Extremely high housing prices, massive student loan debt, and stagnant wages are just a few of the financial hurdles Millennials have had to overcome.

GenZ, on the other hand – the generation right behind Millennials – exist in a different financial picture. Born between 1995 and 2015, they’re the first generation to grow up with mobile technology, and they’ve lived most of their lives under the shadow of the Great Recession. They have an air of self-reliance and frugality. They display financial grace, and they can deliver some valuable financial lessons for their Millennial predecessors.

Minimizing Student Loan Debt
Student loan debt is the elephant in the Millennial living room. Becoming saddled with massive student loan debt practically became a given if you were born a Millennial. The flipside is that Millennials are more educated than any previous generation.

Looking to learn from those who came before them, GenZ is much warier of incurring student loan debt. According to a study by the Center for Generational Kinetics[i], GenZ students may be more apt to try lower-cost options for higher education, such as community college or in-state university systems. And many are working their way through college, paying tuition as they go.

Finding ways to minimize student loan debt could help those Millennials who are still continuing their education.

Retirement Planning
With GenZ’s aversion to student loan debt, it’s not surprising this post-Millennial generation is very concerned with saving for retirement. They’re open to retirement planning and follow a “save now, spend later” principle when it comes to their finances.

This devotion to saving is something every generation can learn from.

Frugality: Effects of the Great Recession
Generation Z is a frugal bunch. They’re often compared to the Greatest Generation – those born approximately between 1910 and 1924 – in that they have a penchant for beginning to save as soon as they enter the workforce and start earning their own money.

Statistics show that 64 percent of GenZ have a savings account compared to 54 percent of older generations.[ii] They’re also bargain hunters. Whereas the Millennial generation was more inclined to pay top price for a brand they love, GenZ-ers know how to look for a deal.

The Financial Mark of a New Generation
It can be said the Millennial generation has been marked by their massive spending power. GenZ, on the other hand, is taking on a reputation for their saving power. A more conservative, old-school aura of frugality and personal responsibility defines this generation’s financial attitudes.

Turns out GenZ has a lot to teach all the generations about personal financial health. If you have a teenager in your life, you might want to take a closer look at how they’re thinking about their financial futures and seeing what you might learn!

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[i] & [ii] https://mic.com/articles/178973/does-gen-z-think-about-money-differently-than-millennials-heres-what-research-shows#.66B2xibb6

September 17, 2018

Generation X: What They Do Right And What They Can Do Better

Generation X: What They Do Right And What They Can Do Better

There’s a lot of discussion about how Americans aren’t prepared for retirement, and Generation X is no exception.

In fact, Generation X may have even less retirement savings than the Baby Boomer and Millennial generations.

A study by TD Ameritrade[i] highlights the problem many GenXers deal with:

  • 37 percent say they would like to retire someday, but won’t be able to afford it
  • 43 percent are behind in their savings
  • 49 percent are worried about running out of money during retirement
  • Almost two out of 10 aren’t saving or investing

The shortfall of savings isn’t without reason. In their financial lives so far, Generation X has taken some hard knocks. They have faced two recessions, disappearing pensions, the rise of the 401(k), and dwindling social security benefits.

What Generation X Does Right with Their Savings
With all those financial forces against them and a decidedly laid-back approach to savings, is there anything Generation X has going for them? Turns out, there is – 401(k) investments and a strong recovery from the 2008 recession.

The 401(k) Generation: Generation X was the first generation to enroll in 401(k) savings plans en masse. 80 percent are invested in a 401(k) plan or something similar.[ii] The fact that almost all of Generation X has embraced the 401(k) retirement savings plan is a revelation.

Rebound: If every generation receives a financial gift, for Generation X, it is their solid rebound after the Great Recession. According to a study by the Pew Research Center,[iii] the net worth of a GenX household has surpassed what it was in 2007. Meanwhile, the net worth of households headed by Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation remains below their 2007 levels.

What Generation X Can do Better When it Comes to Savings
There’s always room for improvement when it comes to financial planning. For Generation X, those improvements are best focused on saving and getting out of debt. Here are a few pointers: Ramp up your savings: Commit to socking away at least $50 a month to start and increase that amount over time. Make sure savings is factored in to your monthly budget. Pay off credit card debt: Credit card debt is expensive debt. Commit to getting serious and paying it off. If you need help, consider consolidating, balance transfers, or getting a personal loan at a lower rate.

A Mixed Financial Picture
Like other generations, the savings snapshot of Generation X is a mixed picture. They have some great financial tools in place with 401(k) plans and a growing net worth.

If you’re a GenXer and if you’re serious about financial health, it’s not too late to commit to a savings plan, get out of credit card debt, and seek to improve your long-term outlook!

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[i] https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2018/01/10/retirement-crisis-37-gen-x-say-they-wont-able-afford-retire/1016739001/
[ii] https://www.aarp.org/money/credit-loans-debt/info-2015/gen-x-interesting-finance-facts.html
[iii] http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/07/23/gen-x-rebounds-as-the-only-generation-to-recover-the-wealth-lost-after-the-housing-crash/

July 30, 2018

The Millennials Are Coming, the Millennials Are Coming!

The Millennials Are Coming, the Millennials Are Coming!

Didn’t do so well in history at school? No worries.

Here’s an historical fact that’s easy to remember. Millennials are the largest generation in the US. Ever. Even larger than the Baby Boomers. Those born between the years 1980 to 2000 number over 92M. These numbers dwarf the generation before them: Generation X at 61M.

When you’re talking about nearly a third of the population of North America, it would seem that anything related to this group is going to have an effect on the rest of the population and the future.

Here are a few examples:

  • Millennials prefer to get married a bit later than their parents. (Will they also delay having children?)
  • Millennials prefer car sharing vs. car ownership. (What does this mean for the auto industry? For the environment?)
  • Millennials have an affinity for technology and information. (What “traditional ways of doing things” might fall by the wayside?)
  • Millennials are big on health and wellness. (Will this generation live longer than previous ones?)

It’s interesting to speculate and predict what may occur in the future, but what effects are happening now? Well, for one, if you’re a Millennial, you may have noticed that companies have been shifting aggressively to meet your needs. Simply put, if a company doesn’t have a website or an app that a Millennial can dig into, it’s probably not a company you’ll be investing any time or money in. This may be a driving force behind the technological advancements companies have made in the last decade – Millennials need, want, and use technology. All. The. Time. This means that whatever matters to you as a Millennial, companies may have no choice but to listen, take note, and innovate.

If you’re either in business for yourself or work for a company that’s planning to stay viable for the next 20-30 years, it might be a good idea to pay attention to the habits and interests of this massive group (if you’re not already). The Baby Boomers are already well into retirement, and the next wave of retirees will be Generation X, which will leave the Millennials as the majority of the workforce. There will come a time when this group will control most of the wealth in Canada and the US. This means that if you’re not offering what they need or want now, then there’s a chance that one day your product or service may not be needed or wanted by anyone. Perhaps it’s time to consider how your business can adapt and evolve.

Ultimately, this shift toward Millennials and what they’re looking for is an exciting time to gauge where our society will be moving in the next few decades, and what it’s going to mean for the financial industry.

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